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FBI Corruption Probe Leads to Allentown Pay-to-Play Ordinance

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It is a pattern we have seen and reported on repeatedly: public revelations of alleged corruption – already criminalized under state law – lead to passage of new pay-to-play laws designed to assure the public that previously lawful campaign activity creating the appearance or potential for corruption will not be tolerated.  Most recently, it is the Allentown City Council which has now passed a pay-to-play ordinance in the wake of a criminal probe.

Allentown, PA

The Allentown inquiry giving rise to the legislation included all of the “usual suspects” in a garden variety public corruption and bribery scandal.  According to published reports and court documents, a local developer pled guilty to participation in a conspiracy – purportedly involving Mayor (and US Senate candidate) Ed Pawlowski – to exchange campaign donations for unnamed government favors, “destroying records, conducting sweeps of government offices for electronic surveillance, and procuring disposable ‘burner phones’ that he believed would be difficult for law enforcement to monitor”.  (For the record, Mayor Pawlowski’s counsel vociferously denies his client’s involvement in the activities or conspiracy for which the developer pled guilty).

Despite the alleged criminal conduct providing the impetus for the legislation, Allentown’s new ordinance – as passed by the city council – provides for significant consequences to the unwary.  As passed, if any individual or business makes a single or multiple contributions in excess of $250.00 or provides services in that amount in a calendar year to a candidate or incumbent, the individual or business “shall not be eligible to apply for or enter into any non-competitive bid contract or be eligible to be a sub-contractor for a non-competitive bid contract or to receive financial assistance (grants, tax incentive, etc.) from the city.” 

It is unclear whether this prohibition applies for the remainder of the year or forever but the ordinance clearly provides that violation of the law by any individual or business (or “family members with a financial interest in the business, business associates, subcontractors,”

PACs, or consultants) during a period when a contract is in place “shall be cause to void the contract” and “shall make the contractor liable for liquidated damages of 10% of the maximum payment to the contractor.”  OUCH!  This is not an ordinance you want your family members, business associates, subcontractors, or consultants violating.

Ironically, the ordinance does not take effect until it has been signed into law by . . . . . . Mayor Ed Pawlowski.  I’m guessing he doesn’t choose to take a stand against this legislation.

Well we’re living here in Allentown
And they’re closing all the contractors down
Out in Bethlehem they’re doin’ time
Ripping up forms
Burning their phones
Well we’re waiting here in Allentown
For the contracts that we never found
For the promises our government gave
If we gave dough
If we behaved

So the contracts they hang on the wall
But they never really helped us at all
No they never taught us what was void
the public’s upset
And they’re annoyed
And we’re waiting here in Allentown

  Every contractor had a pretty good shot
To get at least as far as their old man got
But something happened on the way to that place
They threw pay-to-play in our face

 Well I’m living here in Allentown
And it’s hard to keep a good man down
But I won’t be getting up today

And it’s getting very hard to stay
And we’re living here in Allentown

(Sincere apologies to Billy Joel and the people of Allentown)